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Tracy Thiele
Tracy Thiele
Australia, Gawler South
02 Apr 2021
They were really helpful when I phoned for information and received the product within a few days . Thanks

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Filtered by tag ('makeblock')

Laserbox VS Emblaser 2 Comparison

 by matteo on 22 May 2020 |
No Comment
We've recently had many enquiries as to which laser cutter customers should buy so in response to this we have put together a comparison between the Makeblock Laserbox Pro and the Emblaser 2. Laserbox VS Emblaser 2 Brief Comparison Chart   Laserbox Emblaser 2 Specifications Product Dimensions Laserbox: 95.8 x 52.8 x 26.8cm, Smoke Purifier: 52.8 x 26 x 26.8cm Emblaser: 54 x 72 x 20cm, F2000 Filtration Unit: 42.5 x 25 x 41cm Product Weight Laserbox: 43.3kg Smoke Purifier: 12.25kg Emblaser: 12.7kg F2000 Filtration Unit: 15.35kg Shipping Dimensions Laserbox: 107 x 63 x 43cm, Smoke Purifier: 63.3 x 40.4 x 33.6cm Emblaser: 77 x 65 x 24cm, F2000 Filtration Unit: 51 x 34 x 58cm Shipping Weight Laserbox: 45kg, Smoke Purifier: 15kg Emblaser: 19.60kg, F2000 Fitration Unit: 19kg Laser Type C02 5 Watt Laser Diode Material Capacity 500 x 300 x 15mm 500 x 300 x 50mm Safety Classification Class 1 (the safest laser device rating) Class 1 (the safest laser device rating) Connectivity USB Yes Yes Wifi Yes Yes Ethernet Yes No Materials Emblaser 2 Commonly Used Materials Material Thickness Engraved Cut Notes Fabric - Cotton 3mm Yes Yes   Fabric - Felt 6mm No Yes All colours except white. Leather - Brown Vegetable Tanned 4mm Yes Yes Treatment & color dependant. Air-Assist recommended. Paper/Card - Corrugated Cardboard 6mm Yes Yes   Paper/Card - Pasteboard 2.6mm Yes Yes   Paper/Card - Plain Paper 3mm Yes Yes Any Colour. Plastic - Acrylic Black 5mm Yes Yes   Plastic - Acrylic Green, Red Yellow 3mm Yes Yes   Plastic - Acrylic Translucent (tinted) - Yes No   Plastic - Acrylic Blue - Yes No   Plastic - Acrylic Transparent & White - No No Possible with coating. Plastic - Polypropylene 3mm Yes Yes Air-Assist recommended. Plastic - Styrene 1.5mm Yes Yes   Wood - Birch Plywood 6mm Yes Yes   Wood - Balsa 10mm Yes Yes   Wood - Hardwood Oak 3.8mm Yes Yes   Wood - MDF 6mm Yes Yes   Anodised Aluminium - Yes No   Slate - Yes No   Corkboard 3mm Yes Yes Air-Assist required. Rubber 2mm Yes Yes Air-Assist recommended. Laserbox Pro Commonly Used Materials Material Cut Engrave Mark Paper Yes Yes Yes Corrugated Paper Yes Yes Yes Wood Yes Yes Yes AcrylicYes Yes Yes Yes Cloth Yes Yes Yes Denim Yes Yes Yes Leather Yes Yes Yes Base Plate Yes Yes Yes ABS-based Colour Board Yes Yes Yes PET Yes Yes Yes Rubber Yes Yes Yes Veneer Yes Yes Yes Cork Yes Yes Yes Sandpaper Yes Yes Yes Food Yes Yes Yes Glass Fiber Yes Yes Yes Plastic Yes Yes Yes Delrin Yes Yes Yes Glass No Yes Yes Marble No Yes Yes Rubber Stamp No Yes Yes Stone No Yes Yes Ceramic No Yes Yes Tile No Yes Yes Anodized Aluminum No Yes Yes Corian No Yes Yes Extraction * { box-sizing: border-box; } /* Create three equal columns that floats next to each other */ .column2 { float: left; width: 50%; padding: 10px; } /* Clear floats after the columns */ .row:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } F2000 Indoor Fume Filtration Unit The F2000 Indoor Fume Filtration Unit is very quiet and uses a set of filters containing activated carbon to remove visible fumes. It is also powerful enough to support 2x Emblaser 2 machines at the same time usign a 3D printed connector. Laserbox Smoke Purifier The smoke purifier is just that, it takes the smoke particulate out of the Laserbox however it still needs to be ventilated. Software LightBurn LightBurn is a very powerful software with simple to use tools. The Beginner Mode feature simplifies the interface helping first time users to understand the basic functions without feeling overwhelmed by the various settings and advanced tools. The Emblaser 2 material library contains a varierty of different materials and their recommended cutting/engraving settings. These settings can be easily adjusted and edited to suit your specific material. Laserbox The software is very user-friendly and has a very clean/simple layout making it less overwhelming for students and teachers who are using it for the first time. The software is split into two sections; working and design. The working section contains a view of the material that is in the Laserbox (from the 5MP camera) and an overlay of what you have imported to cut or engrave. The design section contains a white canvas showing what you have imported and various settings for manipulating its orientation & size, inserting rectangular & circular shapes as well as lines and more. Once you have finished moving and editing your project you can preview the outcome and get an estimated time of finish. Our Final Thoughts They are both fantastic machines however if you are after a machine mainly for engraving we would recommend the Emblaser 2 as its engraving is more precise, has different options to find the optimal setting for your material and also comes with the Air-Assist which prevents overburn on the material. If you are after a machine for cutting multiple different materials in a short amount of time then we would recommend the Laserbox Pro as it is a more powerful machine and cuts most materials in 1 pass compared to the Emblaser where it will require multiple.

Makeblock Laserbox Review

 by matteo on 09 Aug 2019 |
4 Comment(s)
Over the past 2 weeks we've been given the opportunity to test out the Makeblock Laserbox, a new laser cutter & engraver. Here's our first impressions on it. It's a very large machine compared to other laser cutters and engravers such as the Emblaser 2, and a lot heavier making it more difficult to move around. Aside from its size and weight we were very impressed with it. It cut and engraved quickly with clean results and the software was just so simple to use making it a fun and enjoyable experience. Pros It's easy to set up The Laserbox comes packed as two boxes; the Laserbox, cables, exhaust pipes & manual and the Smoke Purifier. The manual is easy to understand and has diagrams showing how to connect the Laserbox and Smoke Purifier together. It's relatively quiet When the Laserbox is running a cut or engraving an image it is very quick and doesn't emit a lot of noise, this is perfect for a class environment where you may have more than one going in the background while doing other activities.   Software The software is very user-friendly and has a clean/simple layout making it less overwhelming for students and teachers who are using it for the first time. The software is split into two sections; working and design.   Working This section contains a view of the material that is in the Laserbox (from the 5MP camera) and an overlay of what you have imported to cut or engrave.   Design This section contains a white canvas showing what you have imported and various settings for manipulating its orientation & size, inserting rectangular & circular shapes as well as lines and more. Once you have finished moving and editing your project you can preview the outcome and get an estimated time of finish.   Sketch & Cut Feature This is by far our favourite feature of the Laserbox. With the sketch and cut feature you can sketch on a piece of white paper or their official materials in red or black pen, place it inside the laser box and the 5MP camera will scan the sketch and cut or engrave it with the press of a button. There's no computer needed.   Cons Size & Weight The Laserbox is quite heavy weighing 40kg, a two person machine to move. It's also large taking up a our whole workbench.   Smoke Purifier The smoke purifier is just that, it takes the smoke particulate out of the Laserbox however it still needs to be ventilated. You can use 3rd party filtration units such as the F2000 Filtration Unit which we used. No Air-Assist The Laserbox does not have an air-assist and you can really see the difference not having one makes when cutting and engraving matreials such as 3mm MDF which we used in the pictures below. The picture on the left is from the Makeblock Laserbox, as you can see there is a lot of overburn due to the lack of an air-assist. On the right is the Emblaser 2 which does have an air-assist. You can definitely see the difference it makes.

Makeblock Neuron Inventor Kit in the Classroom

 by matteo on 14 Sep 2018 |
No Comment
What is it? The Neuron Inventor Kit is a new range of programmable electronic blocks for students from the makers of the mBot range of robots. The packaging is tough and thoughtfully designed, with the cardboard box having magnetic catches to make it easy for students to open and close it. The two plastic trays show where items are meant to go which is important for ensuring that things are later put away correctly. The backs of the blocks are magnetic, so you can attach them to the whiteboard etc to better show your students how to connect blocks and form circuits. The Neuron Boards also have metals back to attach blocks to. They are also LEGO compatible. The blocks are nicely made, and they feel and look very durable. They snap together easily using magnetic 'pogo pins'. These are effective connectors as they don't easily fall apart while also being very easy to separate afterwards. The sides of the blocks are colour coded with the Bluetooth and Power blocks being green signifying energy or communications blocks. Input blocks are orange –these included the Funny Touch and Gyro blocks. Output blocks are blue and include the LED panel (containing 64 RGB LEDs), the Buzzer, the Dual Servo Driver and Servo. The included manual is clearly set out and quite useful. The cardboard case materials allow you to quickly construct some of the projects –full instructions were on the iOS app.  Software options There's a Makeblock Neuron app for iOS and Android which you'll need for programming or else you can use the Scratch-based mBlock software on a PC or Mac. I tried the recommended mBlock (version 3.4.11) which is the download from the site but found it couldn’t “talk” to the Neuron set. I contacted CD-Soft and they gave a link. Version 4 supports Neuron really well –you can even connect it with a USB so don’t need a Bluetooth PC. Version 5 is in Alpha release 9 (April 3, 2018) but the earlier release I tried before Easter only supported another product called Codey. I have run out of time to try the current version. Using the kit Neuron blocks have two modes: Online Mode and Offline Mode. When a chain of Neuron blocks is not connected to an iPad or a PC, it stays in the Offline Mode. If you connect the Power block to the Gyro Sensor block and then the LED block you can get the lights to light up by moving the group around or tapping the Gyro Sensor block. Similarly, if you have the LED block replaced with a Servo Driver and Servo, the Servo will move back and forward responding to motion or tapping. Online Mode  Now if you add the Bluetooth block you can connect it to the iPad or PC and program the blocks to respond to instructions. The Apps Neuron App Along the bottom of the screen are various tools (nodes) Basic which includes Compare, Number, Interval as well as NOT, AND, OR and a counter Controls which include Button, Switch, Slider, Indicator, Label, Curve, Number and Text Box Time has Delay, Hold, Average, Today, Now, Pulse and Sequence Advanced contains icons for Random, Scale, Filter, Function, ComputePlus, ComparePlus and Valve A lot of these nodes are for a wider range of blocks – the full set of more than 30 modules can be seen here. Programming on the PC with mBlock version 4 software My example has the Bluetooth, Power and LED panel blocks connected to the PC via USB plugged into the Bluetooth block. When clicked it shows a sad face, waits for 1second and changes to a happy face, waits for 1second and changes to a heart. The program repeats 10 times. The programming was simple and easy to debug (I originally forgot the wait commands and the whole thing was over before I knew it.) My Favourite Block The Funny Touch which has 4 leads with coloured alligator clips and another lead as a Ground. Holding the ground clip and touching any of the other four completes a circuit. It is fun to work with in the Offline mode. I see a possibility of making a race track with the Ground lead attached to a centre track of foil or copper tape and having two Funny leads attached to side strips of foil at the top (the Start line) and two attached to strips again on the side of the track at the bottom (the Finish line). In the Online mode these could possibly be programmed so that when a student-made car with suitable connectors (to touch both the Ground strip and side strips) is placed on it the time of its travel down the track can be measured. Once again I have run out of time to test my ideas. Offline Mode In offline mode I connected the Power block, the Funny Touch and the buzzer. When I touched any of the coloured plugs while holding the Ground plug a sound would play. I connected some fruits to the coloured plugs (an apple, banana, orange and lemon) and these became my musical instruments. By holding the Ground plug and touching each fruit I completed the circuit and made a different tone for each fruit. I experimented and tried to play simple tunes. My granddaughters thought it was wonderful. Still in Offline mode Using the guide on the iPad we were able to use the cardboard shapes and added hardware (Funny Touch connected to the Power block connected to the LED display) to make the light palette. It was a more sophisticated version of what we had been investigating and changed the coloured LED display depending on which plug was touched. Summary This package would fit well into the upper primary school where electrical circuits are part of the curriculum outcomes in the Physical Science strand. The offline mode allows easy connections making it virtually foolproof to complete a working circuit. This makes it a useful tool for introducing circuits. The real fun comes when it is connected to the computer as there is a wider range of things for the blocks to do while running the programs. The two programming options are easy to learn and Bluetooth allows the program to operate things remotely (the Internet of Things -IoT). Having the use of the USB as well means that schools without iPads or Smartphones can use existing non-Bluetooth hardware to program the kits. A great STEM teaching resource. Peter Hope

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